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Shades of White

 

It has certainly been a cold and snowy winter, no? Sometimes this season can be a real downer for those who love painting nature and landscapes. When we first think of landscapes, usually lush green fields or colorful autumn trees come to mind. Thick blankets of snow can seem a little one-dimensional… grab a white sheet of paper and you’re pretty much done, right? Actually, there’s a lot more to discover in snowy landscapes. The subtle variations in color and texture present wonderful visual interest for artists to explore.

 

 

 

Here are some gorgeous paintings of snow. Look at all the different shades and tints of white that the painters found. What kinds of moods are created with each composition?

 

 

 

painting of snow, Snow at Giverny, 1892 by Claude Monet

 

Snow at Giverny, 1892 by Claude Monet

 

painting of snow, Snow-covered Field with a Harrow (after Millet), 1890 by Vincent van Gogh

 

Snow-covered Field with a Harrow (after Millet), 1890 by Vincent van Gogh

 

 

 

painting of snow, To Touch, Refine, 2012 by David Mensing  painting of snow, Blizzard by Karen Thorson

To Touch, Refine, 2012 by David Mensing / Blizzard by Karen Thorson

 

 

 

Did you notice the shades of blue, gold, lavender, and even green? All these variations give dimension and detail to the snow. Even though the predominant color of the canvas may be white, your other color choices will also produce an emotional tone or mood to the piece. Look at how Vincent van Gogh’s greens and yellows create a different effect than David Mensing’s blues and oranges. If you had to attribute a mood to each, what would it be?

 

 

 

Working with snowy landscapes is wonderful training for artists experimenting with color and practicing restraint. If you’re looking for a new challenge or way to embrace the frigid weather in your art, start looking at the snow. Shadow and light can be particularly fascinating in these kinds of compositions so pay extra attention to all you see. You’ll be amazed at all the details and beautiful variations you find.

 

Posted by: Lzahn, on January 28th, 2014 at 3:00pm.
Categories: Tips, Kids, Art

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